November 2012 Newsletter

Cultural Dynamics at Work

Do you manage a diverse workplace that provides a competitive advantage for your company? Are you currently doing business with India or do you plan to do so in the future? We are offering two new Business Magic Training workshops that help you tie the advantages of diversity to the bottom line. Please email or call us at 408-261-2600 if you would like more information about either of these classes.

Working Effectively with India

This workshop will provide detailed information about how to effectively work with India. Participants will develop an understanding cultural dynamics and help them develop skills for effective in-person, email, phone, and video interactions. We will also focus on opportunities and challenges at different stages of India-US business projects. Participants will interact through small group discussions, videos, role plays, and case studies.h India. Participants will develop an understanding of the Indian marketplace, consumers, and customers. The workshop challenges participants to consider varying cultural models and different approaches to communication in an interactive format. The workshop will also enhance participants’ understanding of different cultural dynamics and help them develop skills for effective in-person, email, phone, and video interactions. We will also focus on opportunities and challenges at different stages of India-US business projects. Participants will interact through small group discussions, videos, role plays, and case studies.

Diversity Training

This class links diversity concepts and practices with strategic business objectives and the impact of diversity on the bottom line. A broad concept of diversity is discussed, including diversity of merged organizational cultures, roles, and functionalities in addition to visible aspects of diversity such as gender, age, and race. The class will explore how these differences can inhibit an organization’s ability to achieve a competitive advantage in the workplace. Conversely, if well managed, a diverse workforce can provide competitive leverage in the workplace and marketplace. We’ll examine how organizations can boost performance by creating cultures that draw on the strengths of a diverse workforce. Systemic issues that support – and those that inhibit – creation of an inclusive environment will be discussed. Participants will have an opportunity to gain deeper insights into human biases and behaviors, and consider how each individual can consciously contribute to creating a culture that values diversity. A variety of tools will be used in class, including debates, small group activities and videos.

Writer’s Block - Easily Confused Words

Many words sound alike or seem like other words but have slightly different or very different meanings.

Following is a list of commonly confused words. See if you know the difference.

Accept/Except
Accept means to receive or to agree to something.
Except indicates exclusion.
Example: I accept all of your rules except the one about grammar.

Affect/Effect
To affect is to have influence on. Affect is always used as a verb and never as a noun.
Example: His warnings affected my behavior.
Effect, when used as a verb, means to cause. Effect, as a noun, indicates a result.
Example: Effect a solution to the problem. The effect of his warning was tremendous.

Explicit/Implicit
Explicit means plainly or clearly stated.
Example: The teacher gave the students explicit instructions.
Implicit means something is implied but not stated. Example: I had implicit trust in his decision.

Farther/Further
Farther indicates physical distance. (Note the first three letters of the word.)
Example: Carrying heavy packages made the car seem farther away than I had remembered.
Further means in addition to.
Example: I have no further comments.
Note: As our language evolves, the distinction between these two words is disappearing.

Fewer/Less
Use fewer with individual items that can be counted.
Example: The supermarket express line is restricted to shoppers with fewer than ten items.
Use less with bulk quantities that cannot be counted.
Example: It seems that I have less free time than I used to. There is less coffee in the cup.

Peruse/Skim
Peruse means to read thoroughly.
Example: He thoroughly perused the syllabus to determine if the courses met his needs.
Skim means to read quickly or cursorily.
Example: I was in a hurry, so I quickly skimmed the newspaper.

Sometime/Some time
When used as an adverb, sometime means eventually.
Example: I’ll get to that chore sometime.
Some time means an interval of time.
Example: We waited some time before the bus arrived.

Happy Thanksgiving!

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we would like to give a big Thank You to our fantastic students, clients, trainers and consultants! You are the reason we come to work each day with a smile on our faces and in our hearts. Enjoy this holiday and bounty with your family and friends.

 

Let us empower you and your employees to achieve success in your professional goals and increase your productivity with individual or group classes of the highest quality! Please call us at (408) 261-2600 or email us at info@ComputerMagicTraining.com.

Visit us at www.ComputerMagicTraining.com and www.BusinessMagicTraining.com for more information & on-line registration!